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Residence and Work Permits

If you are a citizen of a country outside the Nordic countries or the EU/EAA and you want to come to Denmark to study or do research, you have to obtain a residence and work permit before you travel to Denmark. Here is a brief overview of how to get a residence and work permit for studies and research:

Students

Residence and Work Permit
In order to apply for a residence and work permit for students, you must have been accepted to a university, college, or institute that is approved by the Danish Government. You can either be accepted as a visiting student or researcher or be accepted to a full degree program.

The application form for students is the ST1. Both you and the educational institution in Denmark must fill out the form and submit supporting documents in order for your application to be processed by the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration. Ask the institution to fill out Part 2 of the ST1 and attach supporting documents, for example letter of acceptance, and have them forward the application form to you. Complete your part of the form, Part 1, and attach supporting documents such as passport. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for students is currently DKK 1,750.00.

If you wish to bring your spouse/partner/children with you to Denmark, each family member must submit a residence permit application. The application form for accompanying family is the FA8. The form should be filled out by both you and the family member. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for accompanying family is currently DKK 1,600.00.

You can submit your application in your home country or in the country where you have resided in the past three months. In the U.S., residence and work permits for students and accompanying family are handled by the Danish Consulate General in New York. As of May 20, 2012, all non-EU citizens aged over 18 must have their photograph, fingerprints, and signature recorded digitally before submitting their residence permit application.  Please read the Consulate’s guidelines on how and where to apply for your permit very carefully. We recommend that you do not submit your application to the Norwegian consulates or the Swedish embassy.

The processing time for residence and work permits for students is approximately 2 months.

If you are awarded a Fulbright grant, you will have an alternate option for submitting your application. You will receive further information on this from the Fulbright Commission once you have been selected for a Fulbright grant.

For further information on residence and work permits for students, please see the official web portal about rules for entering and residing in Denmark: New to Denmark.

If you want to apply for a residence and work permit to Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.


CPR Number
Once you are in Denmark, you will be able to register in the Danish Civil Registration System and get a Danish personal number: CPR. The CPR number is really your key to Danish society. Once you get your CPR, you become a “real” person in Denmark and will have access to, for example, health and medical care, Danish language classes, and will be able to open a bank account. In order to register in the Civil Registration System, you have to have a residence permit and an address in Denmark. The municipality in the area that you live in Denmark is responsible for issuing a CPR number for you.

For further information on how to obtain the CPR number, please see the Civil Registration System’s website.

Important: If you want to apply for a CPR number in Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

Scholars

Residence and Work Permit
In order to apply for a residence and work permit for researchers, you must have been an employment agreement with a university, college, or institute that is approved by the Danish Government.

Scholars going to Denmark to research or teach should use the application form for Employees: AR1. Both you and the educational institution in Denmark must fill out the form and submit supporting documents in order for your application to be processed by the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration. Ask the institution to fill out Part 2 of the AR1 and attach supporting documents, for example letter of invitation/employment letter, and have them forward the application form to you. Complete your part of the form, Part 1, and attach supporting documents such as passport. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for researchers is currently DKK 3,250.00.

If you wish to bring your spouse/partner/children with you to Denmark, each family member must submit a residence permit application. The application form for accompanying family is the FA8. The form should be filled out by both you and the family member. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for accompanying family is currently DKK 1,600.00.

You can submit your application in your home country or in the country where you have resided in the past three months. In the U.S., residence and work permits for students and accompanying family are handled by the Danish Consulate General in New York. As of May 20, 2012, all non-EU citizens aged over 18 must have their photograph, fingerprints, and signature recorded digitally before submitting their residence permit application.  Please read the Consulate’s guidelines on how and where to apply for your permit very carefully. We recommend that you do not submit your application to the Norwegian consulates or the Swedish embassy.

The processing time for residence and work permits for researchers is approximately 1 month.

If you are awarded a Fulbright grant, you will have an alternate option for submitting your application. You will receive further information on this from the Fulbright Commission once you have been selected for a Fulbright grant.

For further information on residence and work permits for students, please see the official web portal about rules for entering and residing in Denmark: New to Denmark.

If you want to apply for a residence and work permit to Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.


CPR number
Once you are in Denmark, you will be able to register in the Danish Civil Registration System and get a Danish personal number: CPR. The CPR number is really your key to Danish society. Once you get your CPR, you become a “real” person in Denmark and will have access to, for example, health and medical care, Danish language classes, and will be able to open a bank account. In order to register in the Civil Registration System, you have to have a residence permit and an address in Denmark. The municipality in the area that you live in Denmark is responsible for issuing a CPR number for you.

For further information on how to obtain the CPR number, please see the Civil Registration System’s website.

Important: If you want to apply for a CPR number in Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

If you have any questions about how to obtain a residence and work permit to Denmark, you can contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

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A view of the famous Copenhagen Opera House from the seaside terace in front of the Royal Danish Playhouse