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Residence and Work Permit

As an American Fulbright grantee to Denmark, you are obliged to follow the general visa laws of Denmark and must therefore obtain a residence and work permit in order to legally stay in Denmark during your grant period. As a citizen from a country outside the EU/EAA and Nordic countries, a residence and work permit is required if you intend to study or do research in Denmark in excess of 90 days.

Students

Obtaining a residence and work permit to Denmark can be a rather long and complicated process. The processing time may be a minimum of 2 months from the day you have submitted all relevant documentation. Please start the application as soon as possible and read the following step-by-step guide very carefully to ensure you get your residence permit prior to arriving in Denmark. More information available on “New to Denmark” website here

Step-by-Step Guide

1. Preparing to Apply for a Residence and Work Permit

Apply and be accepted to a university, college, or institute that is approved by the Danish government

a. If you are not accepted and enrolled at a Danish institution of higher learning, you will not be able to obtain a residence permit, and therefore not able to accept your Fulbright grant to Denmark.

b. You may be accepted to a university, college, or institute that is approved by the Danish government as a visiting/guest student or researcher, or be accepted to a full degree program.

Establish your grant dates

a. You cannot initiate a residence permit application before your grant dates have been approved by the Danish-American Fulbright Commission.

b. Your grant dates form the basis of your Fulbright grant period and residence permit, so it is absolutely imperative that you send the binding dates to the Commission.

c. Your grant dates are typically your first day in class/research group etc. and the last day of exams/in your research group.

d. The final grant dates are binding and cannot be changed later except under special circumstances.

The ST1 and PHD1

a. Master’s students must complete the ST1 application for the residence permit, and PhD students must complete the PHD1 application.

b. The form must be initiated by your educational institution, and you will complete and submit the application. Reach out to your host university if they have not initiated your residency permit application.

2. Apply for the residence permit in the U.S. before you travel to Denmark.

Please note that you can chose between either an online form or a print form. The Danish-American Fulbright Commission recommends the online application form.

Online Application Form (recommended)

a. If your Danish host institution has not already done so, ask them to fill out “Part 2” of the ST1/PHD1 application and attach supporting documents (letter of acceptance) and forward it to you.

b. Create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee via the “New to Denmark” website.

c. The application fee for students is DKK 2,110. We are able to pay the fee for you and deduct it from your Fulbright grant. Notify us by May 1st at advising@fulbright.dk if you would like us to do so.

d. Complete your part of the application form: “Part 1”

e. Attach supporting documents: Photocopies of all pages of passport (including front and back), Grant Authorization, letter of acceptance from the Danish host institution, and receipt of payment.

f. Submit the application, and register for an appointment to have biometrics taken. You can find more information about how to get this done this on the consular websitePlease note that the biometrics has to be done within 14 days after submitting the application.

g. If you are planning to travel to Denmark before SIRI has processed your application, you must inform your address in Denmark in the application form (especially c/o address), where SIRI can send letters to you (request, decision etc.).

Printable Application Form

a. If your Danish host institution has not already done so, ask them to fill out “Part 2” of the ST1/PHD1 application and attach supporting documents (letter of acceptance) and forward to you.

b. Create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee via the New to Denmark website.

c. The application fee for students is DKK 2,110. We are able to pay the fee for you and deduct it from your Fulbright grant. Notify us by May 1st at advising@fulbright.dk if you would like us to do so.

d. Complete your part of the application form: “Part 1”

e. Submit the application (Part 1 and 2) and supporting documents to a Danish diplomatic mission. Please find list of diplomatic missions in the U.S. hereBefore submitting the application to a diplomatic mission, we recommend that you visit the nearest diplomatic mission’s website to get more information before you submit your application. The individual diplomatic mission can have additional requirements regarding payment of additional fees, submission of additional passport photos or additional copies of the application.

Biometrics

As of May 20, 2012, all non-EU citizens aged over 18 must have their photograph, fingerprints, and signature recorded digitally when they submit their application for a Danish residence permit. The facial photo and your fingerprints will be stored on a microchip embedded in the residence card, which will be issued to you if you are granted a permit.

In the U.S., you are able to get your biometrics recorded at the Danish representations in Washington, D.C., New York City, Chicago, San Francisco and Houston. See full list herePlease note that there is a VFS service fee of 33USD and/or a courier fee of 60USD and/or a consular fee to have your biometrics recorded. Fees and payment methods may differ from location to location.

Biometrics with online application form

a. If you have submitted an online application form, you must have your biometric features recorded no later than 14 days after you submitted your application.

b. If you are unable to have your biometric features recorded within the time limit of 14 days, because you are unable to book an appointment at a Danish diplomatic mission, you can inform the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) by e-mail (study@siri.dk) of the appointed time you will have your biometrics recorded. This way you can avoid having your application rejected.

Biometrics with printable application form

a. You can have your biometrics recorded at the same diplomatic mission where you submit your residency permit application.

b. We recommend that you visit the local diplomatic mission’s webpage to get more information before you submit the application. The individual diplomatic mission can have additional requirements regarding payment of additional fees, submission of additional passport photos (of color!) or additional copies of the application.

c. The Danish Consulate General in New York City handles all applications when submitted. If you are not able to submit the application in person to your nearest diplomatic mission, you will have to mail the application form at your own risk to this address:

Danish Consulate General
One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza
885 Second Avenue
18th Floor
New York, NY 10017

d. You can also have your biometrics recorded at the Danish Consulate General. Please note that The Danish Consulate General in New York City may take your passport after the biometrics and mail it back to you.

e. Please read the Consulate’s guidelines on how to submit your application very carefully.

Important Information: If there are any hindering circumstances for why you should not be able to apply for a residency and work permit in the U.S. please contact us, and we will guide you.

CPR Number
Once you are in Denmark, you will be able to register in the Danish Civil Registration System and get a Danish personal number: CPR. The CPR number is really your key to Danish society. Once you get your CPR, you become a “real” person in Denmark and will have access to, for example, health and medical care, Danish language classes, and will be able to open a bank account. In order to register in the Civil Registration System, you have to have a residence permit and an address in Denmark. The municipality in the area that you live in Denmark is responsible for issuing a CPR number for you.

For further information on how to obtain the CPR number, please see the following document or the Civil Registration System’s website.

Important Information: If you want to apply for a CPR number in Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

Scholars

Residence and Work Permit
In order to apply for a residence and work permit for researchers, you must have been an employment agreement with a university, college, or institute that is approved by the Danish Government.

Scholars going to Denmark to research or teach should use the application form for Employees: AR1. Both you and the educational institution in Denmark must fill out the form and submit supporting documents in order for your application to be processed by the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration. Ask the institution to fill out Part 2 of the AR1 and attach supporting documents, for example letter of invitation/employment letter, and have them forward the application form to you. Complete your part of the form, Part 1, and attach supporting documents such as passport. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for researchers is currently DKK 3,250.00.

If you wish to bring your spouse/partner/children with you to Denmark, each family member must submit a residence permit application. The application form for accompanying family is the FA8. The form should be filled out by both you and the family member. Before submitting the application, make sure you create a Case Order ID and pay the application fee, click here. The application fee for accompanying family is currently DKK 1,600.00.

You can submit your application in your home country or in the country where you have resided in the past three months. In the U.S., residence and work permits for students and accompanying family are handled by the Danish Consulate General in New York. As of May 20, 2012, all non-EU citizens aged over 18 must have their photograph, fingerprints, and signature recorded digitally before submitting their residence permit application.  Please read the Consulate’s guidelines on how and where to apply for your permit very carefully. We recommend that you do not submit your application to the Norwegian consulates or the Swedish embassy.

The processing time for residence and work permits for researchers is approximately 1 month.

If you are awarded a Fulbright grant, you will have an alternate option for submitting your application. You will receive further information on this from the Fulbright Commission once you have been selected for a Fulbright grant.

For further information on residence and work permits for students, please see the official web portal about rules for entering and residing in Denmark: New to Denmark.

If you want to apply for a residence and work permit to Greenland or the Faroe Islands, a different application process apply. Please contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

CPR number
Once you are in Denmark, you will be able to register in the Danish Civil Registration System and get a Danish personal number: CPR. The CPR number is really your key to Danish society. Once you get your CPR, you become a “real” person in Denmark and will have access to, for example, health and medical care, Danish language classes, and will be able to open a bank account. In order to register in the Civil Registration System, you have to have a residence permit and an address in Denmark. The municipality in the area that you live in Denmark is responsible for issuing a CPR number for you.

For further information on how to obtain the CPR number, please see the following document or the Civil Registration System’s website.

If you have any questions about how to obtain a residence and work permit to Denmark, you can contact us at advising@fulbright.dk.

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